Archive for August, 2009

Homer Simpson: “Tattoo Fade Creams?” D’OH!

August 31, 2009
Tattoo fade cream cannot penetrate the epidermis to reach tattoos in the dermis. Even Homer Simpson knows that!

Tattoo fade creams cannot penetrate the epidermis to reach tattoos in the dermis. Even Homer Simpson knows that!

The content below is part of an ad for a British Skin Fade Cream made from the same basic ingredients that companies in this country sell as tattoo fade or removal creams and gels. The funny thing is the British company admits in this advertisement that these creams cannot penetrate the epidermis (first layer of skin) to reach the tattoo in the dermis (second layer of skin).

Read the ad, the confession, near the bottom, is highlighted in red.

.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . .  .

Diminish the appearance of dark spots & skin discolorations in 2 weeks*

Visibly lighten the appearance of:

  • Hyperpigmentation / Dark discolorations
  • Age / Liver spots / Sun spots
  • Freckles
  • Tans / Sun damage
  • Melasma / Chloasma
  • Acne marks
  • Old scars
  • Birthmarks
  • Dark elbows, knees, underarms, knuckles
  • Uneven skin tones

Four years ago, Civant Skincare embarked on a business plan to develop their most powerful skin product for dark skin spots, discolorations and hyperpigmentation. Not only was this formula meant to be effective, but also safe for normal use. Though the idea was simple enough, the research and development to create such a product was surprisingly extensive.  To keep the formula up to date, the research team is constantly improving their product line with new innovations.

Civant Skincare puts your safety above anything else. Our products contain absolutely no hydroquinone, mercury, steroids or other harmful bleaching substances. Full results generally appear after 2-3 months of regular use. Please follow the usage directions carefully to obtain the best results.

Active  Ingredients:  .    .    .Nuviderm analysis of ingredients.ingredient explanation copy

  • Alpha Arbutin
  • Gigawhite
  • Teqo Cosmo C
  • Niacinamide (Vitamin B3)
  • Mulberry Extract
  • Bearberry Extract
  • Licorice Extract
  • Lemon Juice Extract
  • Emblica Powder
  • Kojic Acid
  • Lactic Acid
  • Glycolic Acid


Does it work on all kinds of hyperpigmentation?

Hyperpigmentation can occur on many different layers of the skin. Though typically epidermal, hyperpigmentation can occasionally be dermal. Dermal pigmentation (that’s what a tattoo is) occurs underneath the skin where as epidermal is actually on the skin. In the case of dermal pigmentation, topical creams can not penetrate below the epidermis to alleviate the problem. Normally, the melanocytes (skin pigment cells) are located in the basal layer of the epidermis and an increase in number or activity will cause epidermal hyperpigmentation. However, formed melanin may be transferred to the dermis or, in some cases, dermal melanocytes are present.

Topical creams are generally only effective on epidermal hyperpigmentation. To determine what kind of pigmentation exists in your skin, we recommend consulting with a qualified dermatologist.

.  .  .   .

What that previous section means is tattoo fade creams rubbed on the skin do not have  the power to penetrate beyond the top layer of skin to the dermis (second layer of skin) where tattoo pigment is injected to form a tattoo.

Need more proof ? Ask a Dermatologist.

Buy Nuviderm.

Nuviderm works.

***

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Tattoo Mistakes Require Tattoo Removal

August 30, 2009
Holy Cow!...This thing is so ugly tattoo removal isn't good enough, the guy should have a beer belly-ectomy.

Holy Cow!...This thing is so ugly tattoo removal isn't good enough, the guy should have a beer belly-ectomy.

I’ve seen many awful tattoos, some home made some professionally done. Some “professionally” done tattoos are so bad the only reason they can be called professionally applied is because the so called “artist” got paid to do it.

So, as in sports, if you are really  an amateur tattoo artist, but someone pays you to perform that makes you a professional. That is what I call a distinction without a difference – if you suck, you suck no matter your official title.

Since today is Sunday and I really would rather be doing something else I will make today’s entry short and sweet. I am going to log on to Google Images and find what I think, at that particular moment, is the ugly tattoo of the day.

I will say this, the tattoo artist who did this is good, but the subject matter could be better.

***

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Nuviderm, Nuviderm and Nuviderm

August 29, 2009
A true tattoo removal blog - No BS

A true tattoo removal blog - No BS

OK.

I don’t have a lot to say at this moment, I just finished up the Monday blog post and it is good. The artwork, the content are all very, very interesting so don’t miss it. It is entertaining as well as informative and has much information on tattoo removal cream and how a tattoo removal cream would remove Homer Simpson once he got under your skin…in the form of a tattoo, that is.

So don’t forget Monday around 10:00 EST. You’re gonna like it.

***

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Nuviderm Removal of a Tattoo

August 28, 2009
Removal of a tattoo should not be done with a hot iron

Removal of a tattoo should not be done with a hot iron

How many time do I have to say this?

  • Nuviderm is made from a product that has been medically tested and proven to remove tattoos…30 years ago!!
  • It’s what they used to remove tattoos before some guy invented the laser.
  • Nuviderm may be the old way to remove tattoos, but it’s also a hell of a lot cheaper – same result, way, way lower price – what’s not to like?
  • Lasers are inconvenient – you have to go to them.
  • Nuviderm comes to you and you have complete control over where and when.
  • It takes just about as long to remove a tattoo with Nuviderm as it does a laser, but at about 4% of the cost.
  • What you do with the money you save is your business.
  • Like laser removal there are certain procedures that must be followed when using Nuviderm.
  • Each purchase of Nuviderm comes with a little instruction booklet that explains everything you need to know.
  • It takes about the same amount of time to remove a tattoo with Nuviderm as it does with a laser, but with a heck of a lot less burning.
  • Lasers remove tattoos.
  • Nuviderm removes tattoos.
  • A one ounce bottle of Nuviderm tattoo removal concentrate contains about the same tattoo pigment removal power of about $1000.00 of laser treatments.
  • Nuviderm works.
  • This Nuviderm review of itself recommends that you buy Nuviderm and skip the high priced brand.
  • Don’t get me started on tattoo removal creams – they don’t work.
  • Buy Nuviderm.
  • The End

***

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Nuviderm Reviews – Tattoo Pigment Allergies

August 27, 2009
Nuviderm reviews allergies to tattoo pigments

Nuviderm reviews allergies to tattoo pigments

Inflammatory reactions sometimes result from the tissue injury that is necessary for the formation of a tattoo when the pigment is injected into the selected location for the body art. The inflammation  usually recedes without further incident within 2 – 3 weeks and is an expected reaction of your bodys’ immune system to the tattooing process.

Once the initial immune system response has settled down , the most frequent reaction observed  is an allergic sensitivity to one of the pigments used in the formation of the tattoo. These reactions evolve in many different ways and include granulomas, which are a ball-like collection of immune cells which form when the immune system attempts to wall off substances that it perceives as foreign but is unable to eliminate. Spongiotic dermatitis which causes itching and redness on the skin. The  cause is related to allergic reactions to pigments used in the tattoo. Another sign of  allergic sensitivity is Lichen planus,  an abnormal immune reaction provoked by a viral infection or sensitivity to a specific tattoo pigment. Inflammatory cells seem to mistake the skin cells as foreign and attack them.

Usually, allergic reactions to a tattoo pigment are contact dermatitis and photoallergic dermatitis, meaning a sensitivity to artificial and natural light, but most commonly to natural sunlight.

Allergic reactions to red tattoo pigments are the most common and may be caused by a variety of pigments, especially mercury sulfide. Alternative red vegetable dyes have been developed because of the problems associated with red tattoo pigment containing mercury; however, red tattoo reactions continue to be reported although with much less frequency.

Light sensitivity is commonly caused by yellow (cadmium sulfide) tattoo pigment. Swelling and redness may develop with exposure to sunlight. Although the reason is not clear, cadmium sulfide is the light-sensitive material used in photoelectric cells; therefore, the reaction is believed to be phototoxic. Red tattoos are sometimes associated with light sensitivity because of trace amounts of cadmium added to brighten the red pigment.

Pigments used to create green, blue, and black tattoos are much less common.

Blue tattoos that contain cobalt sometimes experience allergic  reactions which can rarely develop into inflammation of the middle layer of the eye called uveitis. Uveitis is a condition that can be treated with steroid eye drops, tablets or injections.

So, aside from tattoo regret, whatever the cause, allergic reactions to tattoo pigment should be taken into consideration when getting a tattoo. Always ask about pigment ingredients and only use the services of clean, reputable tattoo shops and artists.

If you decide it’s time for a removal be sure to consider Nuviderm, the easy, effective and affordable alternative to laser tattoo removal.

***

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Nuviderm Reviews – Tattoo Pigments -Part 2

August 26, 2009

Nuviderm reviews tattoo pigments  - a solid waiting for the liquid "carrier"

Nuviderm reviews tattoo pigments - a solid waiting for the liquid "carrier"

Have you ever noticed that not one single company that markets a tattoo removal product ever mentions what tattoo pigments are actually composed of ? Could it be that they know their product will not remove these pigments and therefore  don’t want to bring up the subject?

Here is something all women can relate to – how the new fingernail polishes, when correctly applied, can last a very long time and require finger nail polish remover (acetone), which is a powerful solvent, to remove the paint pigment? Sure, the finger nail paint may chip or scratch ,but if left alone it would be there for a very long time.

You may have guessed where this is going – the pigments in fingernail polish and tattoo ink are sometimes made of the same thing. Epoxy finger nail polishes are a form of plastic and many tattoo pigments are a plastic base held in liquid suspension for easy injection into the skin. Plastic tattoo pigments have become popular because of their vibrancy under the skin and resistance to fading by sunlight.

Do you think rubbing a tattoo removal cream on your fingernail polish would remove or even dull the finish? Heck no, wouldn’t happen unless the cream had a grit in it and then you are basically slowly sanding the paint off. It would still take quite a while to remove the old paint before you could put on a fresh coat.

The same goes with rubbing tattoo removal cream on your skin to remove tattoo pigment that is deposited BELOW your skin. For the cream to work you must also exfoliate with a gritty cream or use an exfoliation pad or a powered exfoliate of some kind. The exfoliate does the work while the cream may work to fade only your skin pigment – not tattoo pigment.

As I’ve heard said before, you could just skip the cream and simply exfoliate until the tattoo pigment begins to fade and that will take a very long time, longer than Laser,IPL or Nuviderm. As a matter of fact you’ll have several birthdays before you’ve accomplished you goal.

Below is a list of common tattoo pigments, many of the same pigments used in house paint, car paint and yes, fingernail polish.  After you read the list ask yourself how a tattoo fade cream could remove iron oxide, cadmium oxide, copper, aluminum silicate,  titanium oxide or any of the other minerals and chemicals on the list. Even laser and IPL have a hard time removing the whites, blues and greens, but Nuviderm can remove them all because it is a chemical peel, plus it costs hundreds maybe thousands of dollars less than laser or ipl.

Visit Nuviderm.com for more information.

The Composition of  Common  Tattoo Pigments

  • RED:  cadmium red, iron oxide, or napthol. “Iron oxide is also known as common rust. Cadmium pigments are highly toxic. Fewer reactions have been reported with naphthol red than the other pigments.
  • BLACK:  of iron oxides, carbon. Magnetite crystals, powdered jet and soot. Black pigment is commonly made into India ink. Logwood, found in Central America and the West Indies.”

  • GREEN: chromium oxide , Malachite, Ferrocyanides, Ferricyanides,  Monoazo pigment, Cu/Al phthalocyanine, or Cu phthalocyanine.
  • YELLOW: made of cadmium yellow, ochres, chrome yellow, or disazodiarylide. Reactions are commonly associated with yellow pigments because more pigment is needed to achieve  bright color.”
  • BROWNS: made of ochre. Ochre is composed of iron  oxides mixed and clay.  When dehydrated , ochre changes to a reddish color.”
  • ORANGE: made of disazodiarylide, disazopyrazolone, or cadmium seleno-sulfide.
  • BLUE: cobalt blue, or Cu-phtalocyanine. Blue pigments from minerals include copper  carbonate , sodium aluminum silicate, calcium copper silicate  and chromium oxides. The safest blues and greens are copper salts. Copper-based pigments are considerably safer or more stable.
  • WHITE: lead carbonate, titanium dioxide, barium sulfate, or zinc oxide. Titanium oxides are one of the least reactive white pigments.”
  • VIOLET:  manganese  quinacridone,  and various aluminum salts.  Dioxazine and carbazole are the most stable purple pigments.”

***

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A Nuviderm Tattoo Removal Day Dream

August 25, 2009
Tattoo removal daydream?

Tattoo removal daydream?

Just apply the cream and your tattoo will be gone in 30 to 90 days depending on how often you apply the formula or which strength removal cream you purchased. It will no longer be  necessary to wait 3 to 6 months, or in the case of laser removal 12 months, before you can begin your removal. Just wait a week for the pigment injection “wounds” to heal a bit and you can begin removing your tattoo almost immediately.

Young men and women wishing to remove a tattoo so that they can join a branch of the U.S. military can remove the tattoo in 4 weeks, just in time to start basic training at their assigned base.

We young people sometimes make decisions that we wish we could change a week later and this new magical tattoo removal cream, yes I said cream, will allow those quick changes in the case of a regretted tattoo.

That young bride will be able to remove that big red heart with Johnny’s name written across it just in time for her wedding to Josh. After all what husband wants to see another mans’ name on his wifes’ butt? Same goes for that young groom to be. He can erase his  “Susie Forever” tattoo from his shoulder before the honeymoon. Sweet!  I said shoulder because what woman wants her name on her boyfriend/husbands butt?  Men, on the other hand like seeing their name on any womans’ butt.

Of course nothing is perfect, the price you pay to get rid of a tattoo in 30 days will be expensive, but there will be little or no pain involved and no chance of minor scar tissue…none.

Ok…time to wake up because we still live in the present and that stuff just doesn’t exist yet, but someday…

Until then if you’re short on cash but need a good tattoo remover just go to Nuviderm.com. It’s the easy, effective and affordable way to tattoo removal.

***

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Nuviderm Tattoo Remover, Laser and You

August 24, 2009

When getting a tattoo some people don’t understand that they are doing something that will be a permanent addition to  their body. It could be a long planned addition, something done on the spur of the moment,( like after a few to many drinks), or due to peer pressure from your devoted friends.

What ever the reason, it’s there for good, or at least until you decide to get rid of it and that’s when you find out how the word permanent applies to a tattoo. It means it damned hard to remove the thing. That once cherished piece of body art is deep in the skin, flesh actually, and won’t be budged without a fight.

Tattoos are very territorial, like your neighbors’ pit bull, it doesn’t want any thing invading its space and it can put up a pretty nasty fight to hold its ground.

Using sweet talk and a handful of tattoo fade cream won’t work any better than sweet talk and dog biscuit will get that bulldog to keep from biting the crap out of you just because your intentions are good and you’re a nice person. To the bulldog and the tattoo you’re the  trespasser, a stranger to be dealt with harshly if necessary.

Give that dog a biscuit every day and he’ll gladly eat it,  he may even pretend to be lulled into a passive state, but hop the fence and he’ll still bite the crap out of you. That’s sort of the way a tattoo removal/gel works. It fades the skin pigment above the tattoo and you think “wow, this stuff really works!”.

Three months and $250.00 later (the bite) you’ve got a light spot on your skin and the tattoo is still staring up at you, unchanged, unmoved and unimpressed. But, the good thing is your skin is totally unaffected – soft, smooth and unscarred. Unfortunately most tattoo removal cream companies, like pitbulls,  offer no refunds – a total waste money and dog biscuits.

To get rid of the dog and the tattoo you’ve got to get rough, there is no way around it. No matter how hard you wish, how many coins you toss in the local fountain, that tattoo ain’t goin nowhere until you start cooking (laser) or peeling (Nuviderm).

The ink is there and it must be forcibly removed and in the process your skin will be heated, blistered, made dry and flaky, possibly blistered, maybe hurt like hell, possibly scar and for all this you get to pay several hundred, maybe a thousand or two dollars. It’s call laser tattoo removal.

…Or you can forcibly remove that tattoo and in the process your skin may slightly and temporarily burn, made dry and flaky, possibly itch, maybe scab and if you don’t follow directions it could possibly leave a scar all for less than $40.00 for a 3″x3″ tattoo. It’s called Nuviderm.

One ounce of Nuviderm has the ink removing power of up to $1000.00 of  laser treatments. If  you can’t handle Nuviderm you sure as heck can’t handle laser.

To continue with the dog analogy, Nuviderm is like a Lab – it’ll treat you right as long as you read and follow instructions and don’t abuse its tattoo removal power, dilute the concentrate before using, it’s in the instructions. Laser is like a bulldog on a chain, straining to bust lose and attack in the only way it knows – with a ferocity you will not like.

***

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Nuviderm Reviews – Tattoo Pigments

August 23, 2009
Nuviderm reviews - tattoo pigment (cadmium) tanned leather ready to make moccasins

Nuviderm reviews - tattoo pigment (cadmium) tanned leather ready to make moccasins

Iron oxides, carbon, magnetite crystals, powdered jet, wustite, bone black and amorphous carbon from combustion ( soot).

Those are just a few of the procucts  used to make black tattoo pigment. How does it feel knowing the black in your tattoo is plain old soot, possibly scraped off the inside of some guys’ chimney or even the lid of his Weber Barbeque grill. Who knows?

Maybe that’s why black is the easiest color for a laser to remove – use enough heat and soot will vaporize and what doesn’t vaporize will be  carried off to the nearest lymph node for a long nap.

When you actually sit down and study the make up of tattoo pigments it’s a wonder more people don’t get sick or die from something related to the pigment they just had injected into their body.

Chromium oxide, malachite, ferrocyanides, ferricyanides, lead chromate, copper/aluminum phthalacyanine or just plain old copper phthalocyanine. These are the minerals(?) and chemicals(?) under your skin if you have green in your tattoo. I’m not a chemist or a geologist, but some of these greens sound dangerous. Cyanide I know is a poison, but  when combined with iron (ferro) it becomes non toxic. It just makes it more likely that you’ll set off the alarm at the airport when you walk through the metal detector.

I could go on with iron oxide (red), chromium oxides (blue), zinc oxide (white) and many others but I have other stuff to do today – I can’t sit here listing every pigment ingredient you have in you.

For your next tattoo, out of curiosity, ask the artist what he/she is about to inject in you. They probably don’t know or care, it’s the medium used in their art and you just provide the canvas.

So the next time you head off to your favorite tattoo parlor and are considering adding a bit of yellow to that tattoo just realize that one of the minerals used to create yellow, cadmium, is also used to make batteries – you know,  Ni-Cd (nickel-cadmium) batteries and until the mid 1900’s cadmium was used primarily as a leather tanning agent. I guess you could have the bottoms of your feet tattooed with cadmium and have the first pair of  built  in human hide mocassins and never have to worry about having holes in the  soles of your shoes.

Seriously though folks, not all tattoo pigment is bad and there is some bad stuff out there so don’t be affraid to ask questions, after all you’ll be the walking billboard for the body art someone draws on you.

If you get tired of looking at that art work you can always buy some Nuviderm tattoo remover to wipe the canvas clean or to prepare it for that sodium aluminum silicate (blue) coverup.

***

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Tattoo Fade Creams – Don’t be a Sucker

August 21, 2009
Tattoo Fade Creams are Do Not Work

Tattoo Fade Creams Do Not Work

I’ve written several posts about the deceptive nature of Tattoo Cream Removers and the way they advertise their products and then don’t back up their claims with a decent guarantee or in some cases no guarantee at all.

The premise behind tattoo fade creams is they are supposed to fade a tattoo simply by rubbing a cream over the tattooed area once or twice a day and after a few months your tattoo will be nothing but a memory. Well, I call BS on that claim and today I have more evidence that those claims are indeed false.

First we need to cover a bit of old ground to remind our readers how a tattoo fade cream works. Simply put, a tattoo fade cream whether it contain Hydroquinone, Alpha Arbutin, Kojic Acid or any other skin pigment inhibitor, limits or stops the production of skin pigment. When rubbed on the skin above a tattoo it fades the skin in the first layer of skin known as the epidermis and cannot penetrate any deeper. To the unenlightened, all tattoos are located in the second layer of skin known as the dermis. So while you may think your tattoo is fading it is just the skin pigment directly above the tattoo that is fading – not the tattoo pigment itself.

Well, now we have a skin fade product manufacturer in England who has admitted  to that very fact.  Skinlight  (http://www.skinlight.co.uk/product_130_Meladerm+Pigment+Reducing+Complex.html )   a manufacturer of a skin fade cream called Meladerm (no relation to Nuviderm) states as a matter of fact on their website that skin fade creams do not and cannot penetrate beyond the first layer of skin into the second layer of skin where the tattoo pigment is located. They’ve blown the cover of the American companies claiming otherwise and Skinlight is made of the same basic ingredients as the newest and most advanced tattoo removal creams sold in the United States.

Here is the telling paragraph :

Does Meladerm® work on all kinds of hyperpigmentation?

“Hyperpigmentation can occur on many different layers of the skin. Though typically epidermal, hyperpigmentation can occasionally be dermal. Dermal pigmentation occurs underneath the skin where as epidermal is actually on the skin. In the case of dermal pigmentation, topical creams can not penetrate below the epidermis to alleviate the problem. Normally, the melanocytes are located in the basal layer of the epidermis and an increase in number or activity will cause epidermal hyperpigmentation. However, formed melanin may be transferred to the dermis or, in some cases, dermal melanocytes are present.”

So, there it is. Tattoo pigment is considered dermal pigmentation and unreachable by any known tattoo fade cream.  For those of you considering buying a tattoo removal fade cream you need to understand that you are about to be taken for a ride that ends with a thinner wallet and a fully intact  tattoo.

Products such as Wreckingbalm, which includes a small battery operated sander to be used in conjunction with their cream and Tatmed,  which advises their customers to buy an exfoliation pad to aid in the tattoo removal.  These two products rely  on exfoliation as the method of tattoo removal, not the creams, but it’s the monthly purchase of the creams by their customers that make them money.

Maybe one day soon there will be a cream that removes tattoo pigment, but that product does not currently exist.

Laser, ipl, Rejuvi and do it yourself tattoo removal products like Nuviderm are the only medically proven methods of tattoo removal on the market today.

Buy Nuviderm, it works and has been used successfully by thousands. Just be sure to  follow the easy to use instructions, they were written for a reason.

***

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